KatieKish

All posts by Dr. Katie Kish

Evaluating Post-Growth Institutions Part 1: Introduction and Institutions

Inspiration for this short series comes from Walker’s words on resilience, in asking how post-growth institutions can change “in order not to be changed”? Given the increasingly urgent global environmental emergency, sustainability researchers require tools to easily and immediately evaluate and inform response. Such tools need to integrate lessons learned from the multitude of research […]

Defining the Next 30 Years

Alongside other established and emerging scholars in the field of Ecological Economics, I’ve been developing a research agenda for the next 30 years of EE. My motivation for getting involved with this was the retirement of Dr. Peter Victor from York University. It was an indication that the established cohort of scholars who formed the […]

Liberty and the Ecological Crisis

Freedom on a Finite Planet Edited by Christopher J. Orr, Kaitlin Kish and Bruce Jennings Book Description This book examines the concept of liberty in relation to civilization’s ability to live within ecological limits. Freedom, in all its renditions – choice, thought, action – has become inextricably linked to our understanding of what it means […]

Connection to place

TLDR; a limiting social factor on the size of the economy should be how disembedded or embedded individuals are to land and local biosphere. A great deal of our modern process require the lifting out of social relations from community and land, particularly within production. I also offer an approach to restoration ecology that uses […]

Equity and fairness

TLDR; a limiting social factor on the size of the economy should be justice, fairness, and equity. The staggering issues of justice and unequal distribution of wealth and goods means a good life for a few at the expense of well-being of others. There are MANY ways one could approach this topic and many do […]

Strong mental health

TLDR; a limiting social factor on the size of the economy should be the health and well-being of living things. What follows mostly focuses on mental well-being of individuals but I now extend this to all health and all living beings. Making and mental health have a very strong linkage, which is why I focused […]

Profound Community Orientation

TLDR; a limiting social factor on the size of the economy should be the strength and embeddedness of community. A great deal of trouble has gone into ensuring people see themselves as individuals rather than integral parts of a functioning community. This has lead to incredibly detrimental social ailments in both mental and physical health. […]

Meaningful Domestics

TLDR; a limiting social factor on the size of the economy should be the high valuation for reproductive, volunteer, and domestic work. If I were a stay at home mother taking care of children, volunteering at local events, contributing to community growth, and producing food in a local community garden the value of my work […]

Systemic Education

TLDR; a limiting social factor on the size of the economy should be education systems that contribute to the full meaning of being a person and help children connect with one another, places, values, and curiosity. Right now, the main drive of education is to prepare individuals for a place in the job market. Schools […]

Redefined Success

TLDR; our current measures of success are all deeply steeped within growth economics. GDP, deficits, stocks, and individual income are all tied to wealth accumulation. This valuation of success is a social limits to growth as it functions as a taken-for-grant-assumption of what one must work toward regardless of happiness or life satisfaction. Many will […]

Thoughtful Consumption

TLDR; a limiting social factor on the size of the economy should be the ability and prioritization of production and retail habits that allows for more specialized and high quality consumption and locally produced items. This is supported through policies such as building reuse to create local artisan workshops (old malls), enhancing opportunities for citizen […]

Theory of Change

This is the theory of change I developed when I was working on my PhD. The primary theories of social change that inform my dissertation include: a) behavioural economics, b) sociology and psychology of radical change, and c) resilience theory and transitions. This is a part of a larger series of posts from the PhD. […]